Wednesday, 20 September 2017

Reading List Advanced 2

Readers Advanced 2

Your assignments are:

A) You will choose a book to read. Tell your teacher which book you have chosen. (Deadline: 30 Oct.). You will then read the book and watch its film adaptation.
B) You will write a review about the book and its film adaptation. You can also include your favourite quotes from the books and add some explanations. In the final paragraph try to compare the book and the film. You can also try to convince the reader that the book you have chosen should (not) be on the Reading List next year. (Deadline: April)  

Reading List  (suggestions) 
1.            The Kite Runner is a novel by Khaled Hosseini.  Published in 2003, it is Hosseini's first novel, and was adapted into a film of the same name in 2007.The Kite Runner tells the story of Amir, a young boy from Kabul, who befriends Hassan, the son of his father's servant. The story is set against a backdrop of tumultuous events, from the fall of Afghanistan's monarchy through the Soviet invasion, the mass exodus of refugees to Pakistan and the United States, and the rise of the Taliban regime. 336 pages


2. Holes is a 1998 young adult mystery comedy novel written by Louis Sachar. It won the 1998 U.S. National Book Award for Young People's Literature. Stanley Yelnats' family has a history of bad luck going back generations, so he is not too surprised when a miscarriage of justice sends him to Camp Green Lake Juvenile Detention Centre. Nor is he very surprised when he is told that his daily labour at the camp is to dig a hole, five foot wide by five foot deep, and report anything that he finds in that hole. The warden claims that it is character building, but this is a lie and Stanley must dig up the truth. In this wonderfully inventive, compelling novel that is both serious and funny, Louis Sachar has created a masterpiece that will leave all readers amazed and delighted by the author's narrative flair and brilliantly handled plot. 240 pages.

3. Girl with a Pearl Earring is a 1999 historical novel written by Tracy Chevalier. Set in 17th century Delft, Holland, the novel was inspired by Delft school painter Johannes Vermeer's painting Girl with a Pearl Earring. Chevalier presents a fictional account of Vermeer, the model, and the painting. The novel was adapted into a 2003 film of the same name. 258 pages.

4. High Fidelity is a novel by British author Nick Hornby. Rob Fleming is a London record shop owner in his mid-thirties whose girlfriend, Laura, has just left him. At his record shop, called Championship Vinyl, Rob and his employees, Dick and Barry, spend their free moments discussing mix-tape aesthetics and constructing desert-island, "top-five" lists of anything that demonstrates their knowledge of music. 253 pages.

5. Bridget Jones's Diary is a 1995 novel by Helen Fielding. Written in the form of a personal diary, the novel chronicles a year in the life of Bridget Jones, a thirty-something single working woman living in London. She writes about her career, self-image, vices, family, friends, and romantic relationships. 288 pages.

6. Harry Potter is a series of fantasy novels written by British author J. K. Rowling. The novels chronicle the life of a young wizard, Harry Potter, and his friends Hermione Granger and Ron Weasley, all of whom are students at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. The main story concerns Harry's struggle against Lord Voldemort, a dark wizard who intends to become immortal, overthrow the wizard governing body known as the Ministry of Magic, and subjugate all wizards and muggles, a reference term that means non-magical people.

7. The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas is a 2006 Holocaust novel by Irish novelist John Boyne.Bruno is a 9-year-old boy growing up during World War II in Berlin. He lives with his parents, his 12-year-old sister Gretel and maids, one of whom is called Maria. After a visit by Adolf Hitler, Bruno's father is promoted to Commandant, and the family has to move to 'Out-With' because of the orders of "The Fury" (Bruno's naïve interpretation of the word 'Führer'). Bruno is initially upset about moving to Out-With (never identified, but cf. Auschwitz) and leaving his friends, Daniel, Karl, and Martin. From the house at Out-With, Bruno sees a camp. One day, Bruno decides to explore the strange wire fence. As he walks along the fence, he meets a Jewish boy named Shmuel, who he learns shares his birthday. 216 pages.

8. You can also find some adapted novels in our school library. For example:
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens. Penguin Readers or Oxford Bookworms Library. Level 6.
Saving Private Ryan by Max Allan Collins. Penguin Readers. Level 6
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë. Oxford Bookworms Library. Stage 6
The Talented Mr Ripley by Patricia Highsmith. Penguin Readers. Level 5


A. Read these titles

1. Holes, Louis Sachar
2. Girl with a Pearl Earring, Tracy Chevallier
3. High Fidelity, Nick Horny
4. The Kite Runner, Khaled Hosseini
5. Bridget Jones's Diary, Helen Fielding

B. What key words do you think might define each of the books?

a- History, art, 17th century
b- Teenager, mystery, adventure
c- Romance, comedy, London
d- Comedy, drama, music, romance, London
e- Bildungsroman, redemption story, friendship, Afghanistan

C. Watch the trailers of the films based on these books and comment which story appeals to you the most and why.

D. Match each of the following plots with the books-films

a. The unforgettable, heartbreaking story of the unlikely friendship between a wealthy boy and the son of his father’s servant, .............................. is a beautifully crafted novel set in a country that is in the process of being destroyed. It is about the power of reading, the price of betrayal, and the possibility of redemption; and an exploration of the power of fathers over sons—their love, their sacrifices, their lies. A sweeping story of family, love, and friendship told against the devastating backdrop of the history of Afghanistan over the last thirty years, from the fall of Afghanistan's monarchy through the Soviet invasion, the mass exodus of refugees to Pakistan and the United States, and the rise of the Taliban regime. 337 pages.

b. Stanley Yelnats' family has a history of bad luck going back generations, so he is not too surprised when a miscarriage of justice sends him to Camp Green Lake Juvenile Detention Centre. Nor is he very surprised when he is told that his daily labour at the camp is to dig a hole, five foot wide by five foot deep, and report anything that he finds in that hole. The warden claims that it is character building, but this is a lie and Stanley must dig up the truth. In this wonderfully inventive, compelling novel that is both serious and funny, the novelist has created a masterpiece that will leave all readers amazed and delighted by the author's narrative flair and brilliantly handled plot. 240 pages.

c. ...............is an average woman struggling against her age, her weight, her job, her lack of a man, and her many imperfections. As a New Year's Resolution, the protagonist decides to take control of her life, starting by keeping a diary in which she will always tell the complete truth. The fireworks begin when her charming though disreputable boss takes an interest in her. Thrown into the mix are her band of slightly eccentric friends and a rather disagreeable acquaintance who she cannot seem to stop running into or help finding quietly attractive. 288 pages.

d. One of the best-loved paintings in the world is a mystery. Who is the model and why has she been painted? What is she thinking as she stares out at us? Are her wide eyes and enigmatic half-smile innocent or seductive? And why is she wearing a pearl earring? ................... tells the story of Griet, a 16-year-old Dutch girl who becomes a maid in the house of the painter Johannes Vermeer. Her calm and perceptive manner not only helps her in her household duties, but also attracts the painter's attention. Though different in upbringing, education and social standing, they have a similar way of looking at things. Vermeer slowly draws her into the world of his paintings - the still, luminous images of solitary women in domestic settings. 258 pages.

e. The main character is a man named Rob, who lives in London in the mid-90’s, and runs a small record shop. He’s a bit of a dead-ender. Not really going anywhere in his life, and always looking for a way to not get anywhere else. He’s had a few serious relationships in his life, but the most recent one, with his relatively long-term girlfriend has just ended when she left him for another guy. This leads him to question the end of every relationship he’s ever had, all the way from grade school to present day. Rob is an obsessive list maker. Whenever things go right or wrong, he makes a list. That is how we have his lists about his favourite movies, favourite episodes of his favourite TV show and of course, favourite kind of music, musicians and songs. Since he is unable to bring order in his own life, making lists about virtually everything gives this illusion that he has everything under control, although that is far from the truth. His latest list is about his “top five most memorable split-ups”. 253 pages.

ANSWER KEY


B. What key words do you think might define each of the books?

a- History, art - Girl with a Pearl Earring
b- Teenager, mystery, adventure - Holes
c- Romance, comedy - Bridget Jones's Diary
d- Comedy, drama, music, romance -High Fidelity
e- Bildungsroman, redemption story, friendship - The Kite Runner

D. Match each of the following plots with the books
a-
The Kite Runner
b- Holes
c-
Bridget Jones's Diary
d- Girl with a Pearl Earring
e- High Fidelity

Related stories:











Speakout Advanced p 56. Relationships. The Kite Runner. Extra Reading

Speakout Advanced p 56. Khaled Hosseini. Extra Listening

http://showingtheropes.blogspot.com.es/2016/11/reading-listening-writing-task.html

 

 


Thursday, 14 September 2017

Homework 2016-2017

Workbook:
You can do the exercises in Units 1-10

Blog: 
In this blog you will find extra material to improve your English.

Bibliography Advanced 2
Speakout LEAD-IN
Unit 1: Speakout 1.1  Speakout 1.2  Speakout 1.3  Speakout 1.4 & 1.5
Unit 2 : Speakout 2.1: p 20  p 21 & 22  Speakout 2.2  Speakout 2.3 Speakout 2.4 & 2.5
Unit 3 : Speakout 3.1  Speakout 3.2  Speakout 3.3  Speakout 3.4 & 3.5
Unit 4 : Speakout 4.1  Speakout 4.2  Speakout 4.3  Speakout 4.4 & 4.5
Unit 5 : Speakout 5.1  Speakout 5.2  Speakout 5.3  Speakout 5.4 & 5.5
Unit 6 : Speakout 6.1  Speakout 6.2  Speakout 6.3  Speakout 6.4 & 6.5
Unit 7 : Speakout 7.1  Speakout 7.2  Speakout 7.3  Speakout 7.4 & 7.5
Unit 8 : Speakout 8.1  Speakout 8.2  Speakout 8.3  Speakout 8.4 & 8.5
Unit 9 : Speakout 9.1  Speakout 9.2  Speakout 9.3  Speakout 9.4 & 9.5
Unit 10 : Speakout 10.1  Speakout 10.2  Speakout 10.3  Speakout 10.4 & 10.5



Get ready for the speaking exam
Guide
pictures & questions




Assignments

Unit 1: Personal profile
:

Our language assistant this year is called Natalie. She is from Minnesota. Write an email to her with your personal profile. (deadline: 17 Oct)

You will find useful language here, here, here, here, here, here, here and here.

More ideas on how to write personal profiles on page 10.

Unit 2: Discursive essay: write a balanced discussion (discursive essay) on the following theme:


Social networks have drastically changed the way people communicate and interact. Discuss. You will get more ideas on how to write an essay on p 25 & 121, here and here. You will find useful language, here, here , here , here and here (deadline: 7 Nov).

Here you have other ideas for a discursive essay:

Medical advances will soon mean that people will live until they are 200 years old.
Individual countries do not have the right to interfere with the affairs of another country.
Students, not the state, should pay university tuition fees.
Women should be promoted to top jobs in business and politics before men.
E-books: the end of the word as we know it.

Unit 3: Proposal:

Has Mallorca reached a ceiling on visitors? Your local government intends to solve the issue of tourist overcrowding and invites residents to send in proposals. In your proposal you should outline any problems there are, and make recommendations for improving the current situation. You can find useful language and ideas for this topic here and here. You can find more ideas for writing proposals on page 41. Here you can see examples of how to write proposals. Finally, you can find useful language for writing proposals on pages 39 and 132 (3.3) and here. (Deadline 28 Nov)

Unit 4: A problem-solution essay:

According to a recent survey conducted by a government unit responsible for gender violence, two million women in Spain say they have been the victims of some type of abuse at some point in their lives. How would you solve the problem of gender-based violence in our country nowadays?


Write a problem-solution essay about gender-based violence. You will find useful language for this topic here and here. You will get more ideas on how to write a problem-solution essay on p 49 and here. You will find useful language, here, here , here , here and here (deadline: 19 Dec).


Here you have other ideas for a problem-solution essay:

Human rights
Child labour
Economic development
Intellectual Property
Capital punishment
Religious freedom
Environmental awareness
Illegal immigration
Civil liberties
Free trade
Freedom of speech
Gun control
The Global Refugee Crisis (you will find useful language for this topic here, here and here.)
Economic inequality: the gap between rich and poor


Unit 5: A narrative. Choose one of the two options below and write a narrative. You will get more ideas on how to write narratives on p 58 and here. You will also find useful language here .

A) You decide to enter a writing contest. The rules say: Write a narrative that ends with the words “Before leaving, he said – Please, keep it under your hat.”

keep something under your hat: (informal) to keep something secret and not tell anyone else.


B) Write a scrapbook after Christmas with the activities you did together with family and friends.

(deadline: 16 Jan)


Here you have other ideas for a narrative:
Identify a significant experience in your life and write about it. You will find useful language here.
Write a story which ends as follows: "He picked up the unopened envelope and set light to it with a match. With a faint smile on his face, he watched the remains crumble in the ashtray".

Unit 6: Write a report

The language school where you study English would like to know the opinion of its students about the school web page and the teachers' blogs. To see how to write a report click here.


Here you have another idea for a report:

Write a report about the housing situation for young people. Find the details here. (Deadline: 6 Feb)

Unit 7:
Make a presentation. Give a 10 minute presentation on one of the curriculum topics. You can find some tips here. Deadlines: before 31 Oct tell your teacher the topic. In February give the presentation.

A formal letter or email

You are given a spa voucher as a present. According to the brochure you can choose from a wide range of pampering spa services and luxury treatments. You are looking forward to a weekend of well-being and relaxation, but after redeeming your voucher you feel worse than ever. Write an email of complaint to the spa resort.

redeem something to exchange something such as shares or vouchers for money or goods. Sp. canjear. E.g. This voucher can be redeemed at any of our branches.


Useful language for writing letters: here , here and here.

(Deadline: 20 Feb)


Unit 8: Article. A series of articles is being published in a magazine you read under the title Tell Me What It's All About. The articles are all attempts to explain something that is currently popular to people who have never heard of it and know nothing whatsoever about it. Readers have been invited to send in their own articles under this title. Write your article, remembering that it must assume no knowledge of its subject on the part of the reader. To see how to write articles click here and also here. On page 97 you can also read some guidelines to improve descriptive writing. Finally, you can find useful language for writing here. (Deadline: 13 March)

Unit 9: Write a review of a book you have read this year and compare it to its film adaptation. Useful language. (Deadlines: before 31 Oct tell your teacher the book you are going to read. In April hand in your review) Click here for a list of readers and more instructions for this assignment.

Other ideas for reviews:

Write a review of two books/ two hotels / two art galleries / two museums/ two films / two concerts... and compare them.

Unit 10: Application letter and Character Reference. (deadline: 8 May). Find the details here.
More ideas on how to write letters:
You will find a letter writing guide here and here . You can find useful language here.
Formal letters.
How to write. 

Last assignment:
Reflection: write a letter to your teacher (deadline: 15 May)

We are approaching the end of the academic year. You decide to write a letter to your teacher giving him some feedback about the course. In your reflection you can include aspects of the course that you loved or loathed; what you found useful or useless; suggestions for the future and any other aspect you may consider worth pointing out in order to improve the teaching and learning process of this course.
You will find a letter writing guide here and here . You can find useful language here.
Formal letters.
How to write.